About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 35
Book TV 20
( more )
STATION
CSPAN2 38
ALJAZAM 37
CNNW 34
CSPAN 26
CNBC 21
MSNBCW 20
KCSM (PBS) 19
FBC 9
LINKTV 8
KQED (PBS) 6
MSNBC 5
KGO (ABC) 4
KPIX (CBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 270
French 9
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 281 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their ♪elp in this series. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> on c-span tonight, libyan activist discuss. then another chance to watch "first ladies" on the life of dolley madison. >> coming up on the next "washington journal," -- 's tomorrow night, on c-span encore presentation of "first ladies" -- is not>> campaigning allowed. you cannot do that and you cannot ask for office directly. you have used subtle back channels. women were a good conduit for that. come to spread their gossip and ask their favors. she knows she cannot trust these people. she is not naÏve. a lot of them are spreading false information, false gossip, they are misleading and have all of their own agendas. she is aware of the political gain going on and is not a fan. >> the encore presentation continues tomorrow night at 9:00 eastern o
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
know, with iraq and the attacks on the terrorist targets. it's the way washington is unfortunately. that those leaks come out. i guess it's part and parcel of the way our open government works and the nature of what happened in d.c. >> thank you, general, for joining us this morning. in our next hour we'll talk about the u.s. options in syria with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. senator men nen doesendez will join us. >>> a military jury needed just two hours yesterday to decide on a death sentence for major hasan, the ft. hood gunman. he admitted killing 13 people and did not defend himself at his trial. he said he acted to protect islamic fighters overseas. he will be the first american soldier to be executed in more than 50 years. >>> firefighters in california's syriaear sierra nevada are gaining ground this morning on the rim fire in yosemite national park. video shows just how big this fire is. yesterday, the flames forced park officials to close the main entrance on yosemite's east side. the fire is now 30% contained this morning.
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
the argument that the world needs to do something but only to a opinion. patty culhane. al jazeera washington. >> mike, the administration direction has changed drastically, what happened? >> that is a testament to not only the power of the images, the horrific images but the testament to the power and ability to distribute those images. remember this happened last wednesday. thursday the president gave an uf statement that says we need to act within the auspices of international law. then the need for international inspectors, then the images continued to pour in. the international investigators set, assad needs to let the investigators in. the administration says there is little doubt that assad was responsible then yesterday we heard that extremely strong statements from secretary kerry in part to galvanize public opinion where he called it a moral obscenity and culminated by today where joe biden said there's no doubt the assad regime is responsible. >> mike, the american people are wary of any military involvement in syria. how does the president sell this military action? >> what's impo
troops to general washington. there is no doubt this was a massive setback for the british war effort. but the fact remains that even surrendering 7000 troops to washington, the british still and tens of thousands of more troops in north america and they could have somebody tens of thousands of more troops from other parts of the empir empiref they had decided to do so. but they were not able to do so because of the power of a new force in insurgent warfare, a term that was only going to faithfully in 1776, the power of public opinion. now, if the founding fathers had been battling the roman empire i can assure you that the romans, no matter how many battlefield defeats they would've suffered, would have come back and george washington, the founders, would have been crucified quite literally. the fact that this did not happen is because of what happened in an institution that the roamers did not have to worry about, at least not after the rise of the empire. and that was the house of commons, parliament. in 1782, a year, in the year after the battle of yorktown it was a very close vot
washington post," the paper battles falling circulation. what does this mean for the business of media? more analysis with bertha coombs from the states. and also, we take the pulse of the solar industry with edward guinness, ceo of guinness alternative energy fund. got any thoughts or comments, please e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. we kick off in the corporate sector. a bit of a sell-off for want of a spin-off. sony shares dropping more than 5% after the japanese firm rejected investor dan loeb's plan to spin off part of its entertainment arm. some losses after the hedge fund said it would keep talking with sony to find more shareholder value. in a letter to third point, the ceo defended keeping full control of the entertainment unit, saying it helped to drive synergies. sony agreed to sharpen its earnings picture when it comes to disclosing movie and music revenues. you said they wouldn't really bend to dan loeb's influence. where does this leave him now? >> well, i think the fact of the matter is that if there is more recognition about the fact that the japanese companies move a lot more
democracy, good to see. in washington d.c., the chief political columnist and one house correspondent for newsmax. what are the issues that could fit into something called human rights under the criminal justice system? your time is scarce. tell us what you have written about its implications and ramifications for all of us. >> i am following this case like you are for several years. each time there's something new, it gets more and more unbelievable if you have read kafka or orwell, this is nothing. they say the russian officials stole 230 million. people put him in prison when he testified and he stayed in prison 358 days after he was tortured and almost died. after this campaign started, the united states and europeans want to maybe discuss it. at the same time, russia saw european union will react in the same way the united states did. they decided to judge the dead man, he was found guilty, being dead, and his chief was sentenced to nine years in prison in russia. >> the idea of convicting someone who is dead does seem somewhat bizarre, almost medieval. in terms of talking about
than the timeline of the way things are unfolding on the streets of cairo. we come back to washington. >> no, i do not think so, because during the time period we are talking about, a joint diplomatic endeavor with the uae, i believe it was, in cairo, and you had, i think, a kind of very real hope that, as i said earlier, all of this could be put quickly on the rails, and you could avoid this uncomfortable discussion for washington, was it military, was it not, and what you have now is a completely different situation. it is completely radicalized, where you have no apparent room for compromise, and a consistent upping of the rhetoric, i would say -- >> the two u.s. senators, john mccain and lindsey graham, they went to cairo, and they were talking about the military. >> but they are two voices in congress that has taken a quite different view looking at the larger stakes involved. i think for the united states, the larger stakes, what the u.s. government is trying to do, what washington is trying to do is to remind everybody, particularly egypt, that egypt is very delicate, and some
, nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> she's amazing. msnbc contributor mike barnicle. and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the -- >> amazon -- >> newly sold "washington post," wow, big news there, in your world, gene. we'll talk about that. >> no free shipping for you, mika. >> he's like the free shipping czar now. >> my goodness. none for me. >> all right. mike barnicle, this is like a big day -- >> mike, this is huge. >> this is. >> this is -- >> i was surprised. >> as willie was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world and then we had a couple smokes and watched old reruns of "night of a thousand". >> you ran out of cigarettes before i got there. >> one pack talking about the globe, another pack -- >> the sale of the post as i'm sure gene will have more to say on this, it was stunning. >> it's an earthquake. >> stunning. >> but no family, few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family and i choose to think donnie graham and the waymouth aspe
, all eyes on washington and the state department. that's because secretary of state john ker seset to make a remark on the situation in in syria. his comments come after u.n. investigators completed an inspection of chemical weapons attacks today in and around damascus. the u.n. saying investigators interviewing survivors and doctors and collecting samples before returning to their hotel, but not until after there was a sniper that forced them at one point in time to rey treat. we go to washington. bring us up-to-date. >> reporter: all along in the five days since that chemical attack and the horrific images out of syria to television and computer screens worldwide, the administration from the president down stress any option or retaliation exercised must be of an inter national nature. of we know that john kerry had at least two dozen phone calls with his counterparts around the region and world including the syrian foreign minister on saturday. he spoke with the 4 french and the foreign ministers from a number of gulf states. the united states doesn't want to go this alone and br
that is -- the exaggerate, i don't think any of us can overstate the difficulty that is being encountered in washington now. this is a clear result in london, and leaves united states high and drive. on the other hand, look at how the drums have been beating this week. even absent the crucial pieces of informing require which had is who did this thing. we may not know what happened but we may not know who authorized it. let me just pause our rea. paul is on capitol hill. first let's go to the white house, what are you hearing? >> the administration is doubling down. it has been crossed once before by the administration own estimation, earlier this year. but the images that we saw coming across television screens over the course of the last several days really changed the tone here in washington. talk about this before. the president most recently in an interview with pbs that aired last night, called for a clear and decisive way to send a shock across the bow of the regime. clearly, the president is talking in the context of punishment, to set an example of the asaad regime. an example for iran and north k
in washington, she took her sweets where she could find them. apparently she had her sons and others buy chocolate shells by the barrelful and she writes about the medicinal qualities of fudge. i mean it was as if she took it where she could find them. that's pretty pathetic. >> i would say that the shells are probably not bon-bons. she is not sitting on her sofa munching. they're the cocoa bean shell. you would steep them in hot water. it would be like coffee and you would add milk. she was interested in the medicinal qualities of it. i wouldn't go too far on john quincy's sourness. there is affection between the two of them and great love. otherwise she could have stayed in quincy. >> after they lost, i think, the daughter, is it true he gave her a book on the diseases of the mind? >> some months later, yes. >> it's the modernize, the insensitivity. he is certainly not a modern husband. louisa had by one count nine miscarriages. >> minimum five and a still birth, officially more. -- potentially more. they are sometimes hard to read into it because of how discreet they are with their la
're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final moments of freedom for the surviving boston marathon bombing suspect. >> on this day in 1963, martin luther king jr. delivered h famous i have a dream speech. >> president obama among those who will speak at a cere
the conversation continues at facebook.com/cspan and # cspanchat on twitter. and washington journal tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern with your phone calls and comments. formerst guest is the department of, and security chief. homeland security chief. will beseo medina talking about the august recess and immigration reform. on later, a spotlight $4.5zines and the recent billion construction project for the and tomorrow evening, we will focus our attention on the issue of media coverage of war. live at 7:00 eastern tomorrow night here on sees and. ,eason two of first ladies influence and image, began monday -- begins monday, and.mber 9, with a second all this month, we are showing encore presentations of season one each weeknight at this time, 9:00 a.m. eastern. programs on every first lady tom barbara washington abigail adams. tonight, abigail adams area -- adams. ♪ > abigail would grow to be the equal of john adams as confidante and dearest friend. >>she has really revealed herself as, yes, an 18th-century woman, but her concerns sound very modern to us today. >> john and abi
in washington, today marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, a major celebration is planned bringing together former presidents, politicians and dozens of stars but the event is more than just a tribute to the progress made by the civil rights movement, it's a reminder of the work that remains. cnn's don lemon has much more on this. >> reporter: 50 years ago today about a quarter million people marched on the national wall on wash twush demand change. dr. martin luther king jr. sharing his dream for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while
. washington has also alerted u.s. citizens not to travel to pakistan. the u.s. has issued a worldwide alert warning americans that terrorist organization al qaeda may be planning attacks in august. particularly in the middle east and north africa. we will, of course, bring you more on this story as it comes into the newsroom. supporters of deposed egyptian president mohamed morsi have turned their ongoing sit in into a massive street party in cairo to celebrate the end of ramadan and the start of eid. thousands of morsi followers defiantly took to the streets, including his wife and daughter, will make their first public appearance since he was ousted in july. yes, despite warnings from the military backed government that security forces would clear the pro-morsi cam. catherine is in cairo, and she has the latest. >> continuing their protest on this, the second day of the eid holiday in egypt. planning a number of marches from different mosques around cairo due to converge on the main sit in. square outside cairo university later on this afternoon. the coalition, as morsi supporters call th
bought and sold in washington. i'm sorry, what are you saying? >> ok. >> the democracy is bought and sold in washington. this is not the idea of democracy that brought me to the united states. i came from another country where there was a dictatorship, i was expecting ideal democracy where one person and one vote was -- host: where are you from originally? >> cameroon. >> my daughter was snatched from the street not because she was doing anything wrong simply because she stopped ask directions from a cop that doesn't understand french and she doesn't understand english, and because of that she has been in a mental substitution for eight years. i've done my best, everything i could to get out and she can't get out. from france where she came from and now she can't go back to france. the immigration will not deport her to anywhere. so i don't know what else anybody can do in this country to have the right justice, t take you can't jus anybody from the streets or your house. host: angie from scombrooksville, florida. -- from jacksonville, florida. good morning, you're from our independent l
26, 28 billion dollars. he is personally paying 250 million for "the washington post." and imogen lloyd webber says that this deal could give him more influence in d.c. over politics, really? >> and profit is paper, buy influence to an extent. washington d.c. obviously a company town. this is a company paper and busy trying to make inroads into washington d.c. last week obama was doing that great big jobs speech in tennessee at an amazon warehouse. and amazon has been dealing with sales taxes and that big drama recently is going to come up against regulators moving forward because it's just so big. so, yes, it buys him a seat at the table, so it's a factor buying it. only 1% of his fortune to get a seat at the table. >> do you agree with that strategy. do you think it's a good idea for the top guy in a top company to approach politics and get involved in politics, and get involved in washington, the company town, the political town? is that a good move? >> it's necessary. the tech guys have been doing that although the guys are spending a fortune on the lobbyists in washington and
and smoke it, too. the feds will now let states decide on pot. >> i love seattle, washington, rocks. >> colorado, washington. >> they call it wake and bake. some wake up every morning. ♪ light up. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> more on the doj pot decision a little later. good morning to you, i'm carol costello. first up, syria. president obama reaches out and u.s. allies back away. this morning an international coalition to support military strikes on syria is crumbling. the most stinging rejection from washington's closest ally. take a look at the cover of "new york daily news" the british aren't coming. british lawmakers voted against taking any part of any military action. other allies like germany and france are also gun shy, still haunted by the iraq war. those concerns echo loudly in congress where more than 160 lawmakers, both republicans and democrats, are demanding at least a full debate before any strikes are launched. last night, president obama and top members of his cabinet spent 90 minutes trying to rally support among skeptical lawmakers. >> the congress, l
of rowing wealth inequality. more on that later. it is friday, august 30. i am megan la paz and washington, d.c.. president obama and his cabinet are still delivering on whether or not the u.s. should become militarily involved in syria and to what extent. six jerry of state john kerry addressed the public reiterating administration rhetoric against bashar all assad. >> our concern is not just about some far off land oceans away. that is not what this is about. are concerned with the cause of the defenseless people of syria is about choices that will direct the effect our role in the world and our interest in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. >> he went on to say the president said in syria will dictate how future regimes treat their people. as of right now president obama says no final decision has been made. >> i have said before and i meant what i said. the world h
why washington works so badly for the rest of the country, the book explains that it works extremely well for its most important citizens, the lobbyists. the permanent government of the united states is no longer defined by party or branch of government, but rather by a profession that has comfortably encamped around the federal coffers. the result, according to many measures, is that washington has become the wealthiest city in the united states. leibovich describes a city in which money has trumped power as the ultimate currency. lobbyists hold the keys to what everyone in government, senator or staffer is secretly searching for, a post-government income. in 1974 only 3% of retiring members of congress became lobbyists. today that number is 42% for members of the house and 50% for senators. the result is bad legislation. look at any bill today and it is a gargantuan document filled with thousands of giveaways. the act that dree atd the federal reserve in 1913 was only 31 pages home. the 1933 glass steeg al legislation was only 37 pages long. the dodd-frank bill is 848 pages plus th
. i'm candy crowley in washington. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today. first up, the end of the american dream. can americans make it no matter where they start from? a blockbuster new study gives us the answers, and we will delve into them. >>> then, imagine an iranian president who thinks nuclear weapons are a waste of resources. well, exactly such a person assumed iran's top elected job this week. we will talk to people who know president rouhani. >>> later the prince of saudi arabia sounds the alarm about his country's future. can saudi arabia endure? >>> and finally, how to make a hamburger without killing a cow, and why it might save the world. >>> but first here's my take. the hottest political book of the summer, "this town" by mark leibovich is a vivid detailed picture of the country's rule elite filled with fake friendships and sensationalist media. beneath the juicy anecdotes is a depressing message about corruption and dysfunction. if you're try
for your analysis of the national defense university in washington d.c.. attack thatside rocked the u.s. military in 2009. they opened fire on fellow soldiers at the fort in the military base. he has admitted killing 13 people and injuring 32 others in the attack in 2009. the opening of his court artial has declared -- trying to find a way out of the deadlock in egypt, to senators in cairo to hold talks. republicans wednesday gramm and john mccain sent by president obama. they have been talking to , at this is what john mccain had to say. >> we have also said that the circumstances of the former government's removal, we have not come to egypt to dwell on the past. democracy is the only viable path to a lasting stability, national reconciliation and sustainable economic growth. and the return of investment and tourism in egypt. >> to an asia is bracing itself for protests later this tuesday. they're calling for the islamists led government to go. turmoil has mounted in recent months since the assassination of two opposition politicians. >> to killings that have struck at the heart of t
ago police in washington state releasing surveillance video surveillance photos of two suspects in the fate beating of a world war ii veteran who was wounded in the battle of okinawa. the murder victim, 88-year-old delbert boughton, spokane washington police say two teens beat him to death last night. they attacked him in a parking lot of an ice arena. officers found the victim in his car. he had serious head injuries and later died. police are now looking for two suspects. anyone with information on this crime is asked to call police. we're going to bring you more on this breaking news story as we get it. >>> right now, another unthinkable crime. >> one of the perps claims to have knocked out five white people since the zimmerman trial. very happy and proud about it. same guy claims that 90% of whites are nasty, and he hates them. but it is your host, rush limbaugh, who injected race into this story. >> i can tne of them have said, the one that is talking said, we were bored. we wanted something to do. we wanted to kill somebody. >> we saw in social media allegedly linked to on
allies won't be able to take part in any key action for some time. >> i'm joined now from washington by the former u.s. ambassador to n.a.t.o. welcome. >> thank you, good to be here. >> it appeared there was a move to slow down the united states today. was it successful? >> well, i'm not sure that the united states was in a hurry, so i'm not sure that it's a move to slow down the united states. there is obviously a lot of jockeying for position going on. i think there are several things worth clarifying. one of them is what the facts are. that we have a preponderance in belief that the syrian government was responsible for the attacks, the belief is in the u.k. and france. however, we don't have the support from the u.n. and everyone wants that to have a wider understanding of what happened. the second is the role of the united nations security council. everyone would like to have a security council resolution. the problem that we have is not that people are seeking to use force or that the u.n. security council is being asked, it's that russia in particular is standing in the way of
in march 2011. in a washington post piece today, they write about that just a little bit. they say despite government assurances that they would protect the right of peaceful protesters, massacres only increased in severity, and the serious government deployed tanks and rooftop snipers and established checkpoints to control movements. this was back in 2011. a point out the defection of officers, with the free serious army back in july 2011, and the video of the officers issued at that time. here is kevin. he is calling from fort wayne, indiana, on our independent line. >> thank you, first of all, c- span for airing this program tonight. it was a wonderful display of democracy. in terms of the position of where i feel our government should take, i was in total agreement with the representative from new hampshire added would be nice and would be refreshing if forth itsould carry constitutional duties, because if any military action is taken, any form of military action is taken, we are first and foremost looking at committing an act of war. therefore, congress should be involved in deciding
in don't blink. >> scary stuff np director of washington examiner and washington reporter for the "daily beast." mark, i will start with you. how surprising. in all seriously, the thing about ted cruz is for a long time it was, there was 17 or so tea partiers in the house and it was easy to say, it is the house. and ted cruise legitimized that part of the tea party elevated it to a national level. wouldn't you say? >> i don't think ted cruz did it. i think the tea party did it itself when they add tremendously successful 2010 election. and since then learned that it is not so easy in american politics. you have to do successive elections. and they've kept to it. they kept organized. and they elect smed significant people like ted cruz. >> but it does feel like because he is? the senate, there is this division of the house. they are whacky and the senate is this more thoughtful body and to have a senator i do think changes dynamic a little bit with the tea party. >> one would hope so. whether you're coming from the left or right in this country, there is a tremendous yearning as my examin
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
in here. the western powers and london and paris and in washington, the leaders have been mulling over a military option. we have spoke time and again -- >> the situation with this chemical weapons attack has forced the obama administration to acknowledge, but only the severity of the situation, what also it can only sort of be evasive about what has been meant by crossing this red line. i think that as london and paris publicly ratcheted up the rhetoric about what needs to be done in response, president obama -- there has been a lot of pressure for a variety of reasons for making good on the chemical weapons convention and making clear this kind of attack is inconceivable and unacceptable to the international community. the president understands that his credibility on this issue is at stake and in ways that he really has to balance this against the strong public opinion against any significant intervention. >> descents within the u.s. -- do you sense within the u.s. there is a lot of mounting pressure to take a tough line? >> john mccain is one of the most adamant and eloquent partis
an op-ed in the washington journal, urging congress to reverse sequestration, or watch military readiness go into decline. mckenzie, why don't we start with you? i will ask you a couple of questions, and then we will go to the audience. we are going to finish at 11:30. .> thank you for monitoring -- for moderating. it is a pleasure to be up here with you and my good friend michael, who recently authored but we were also together with secretary hegel and his team last week, at the briefing about these choices and the outlook. i am sure we will talk about what was discussed in that conversation. i think you have set the ground very well. that important to remember sequester is not the starting point. so much in washington feels like we are always starting at square one. but sequestration is the fourth year of budget cuts. the drawdown has been well under way. our spending peaked in 2010. there has been reduction in capacity and real budget cuts ever since. roughly, been almost, a $1 trillion taken out of current or planned dod spending before sequestration. that is why this is tou
. "washington journal" is next. >> our concern with the cause of the defenseless people of syria is a bout choices that will directly affect our goal in the world and our interests in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. >> secretary of state kerry making the case for potential military strikes in syria as a response for the use of chemical weapons. president obama also speaking yesterday, saying he is still waiting operation -- us bill weighing options -- still weighing options. we want to hear from you about not only what was given, information wise, but if you are convinced by it. here is how you can weigh in this morning. republicans,for democrats,0 offor independents.or you can reach out to us on facebook, off of twitter, and at journal@c-span.org. it was a four-page document that was put out by the administration, showing some of the cases they are making as far as what they have found in syria. this is what was unclassified, not everything was put out there. you can also find this document at our website, c-span.org. a little bit from it -- also it says -- there is mor
, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown at the roman revival architecture. [laughter] again as a hel hope to make cle, franklin was an implacable foe and felt it was a real weight around the neck of middle-class and a spotting workers who are to get education. i will speak for about 35 minutes roughly i'm helped allow a lot of time for questions. i've been told this is an audience, an event good for discussions and questions. i welcomed the. goin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 281 (some duplicates have been removed)